Read the text and match the headings (A-E) with the paragraphs (1-5)

A A new pair of ears

B An author and researcher

CElectronic immortality

D Computers that speak

E A new pair of eyes

1 ____

Medical scientists are already putting computer chips directly into the brain to help people who have Parkinson’s disease, but in what other ways might computer technology be able to help us? Ray Kurzweil is the author of the successful book The Age of Intelligent Machines and is one of the world’s best computer research scientists. He is researching the possibilities.

2 ____

Kurzweil gets computers to recognize voices. An example of this is Ramona, the virtual hostess of Kurzweil’s homepage, who is programmed to understand what you say. Visitors to the site can have their own conversations with her, and Ramona also dances and sings.

3 ____

Kurzweil uses this technology to help people with physical disabilities. One of his ideas is a ‘seeing machine’ . This will be ‘like a friend that could describe what is going on in the visible world’, he explains. Blind people will use a visual sensor which will probably be built into a pair of sunglasses. This sensor will describe to the person everything it sees.

4 ____

Another idea, which is likely to help deaf people, is the ‘listening machine’. This invention will recognize millions of words and understand any speaker. The listening machine will also be able to translate into other languages, so even people without hearing problems are likely to be interested in using it.

5 ____

But it is not just about helping people with disabilities. Looking further into the future, Kurzweil sees a time, when we will be able to download our entire consciousness onto a computer. This technology probably won’t be ready for at least 50 years, but when it arrives, it means our minds will be able to live forever.

Use of English

Choose the correct item.

1. … best friend, Sunny, wants to be a doctor when … grows up.

A) I; himself B) My; him C) My; he D) Mine; his

2. The cat is sleeping in … basket, which was bought by … .

A) she; us B) his; our C) her; them D) its; me

3. Is this … handkerchief?—It certainly is not … .

A) your; mine B) his; ours C) your; your D) my; their

4. Olena Petrivna is … class teacher. … is 29 years old.

A) our; He B) our; She C) we; Her D) us; She

5. … cat gave birth to some kittens. … are so adorable.



A) Her; We B) My; She C) My; They D) Your; He

6. … seems so miserable. Nobody looks after … .

A) He; himself B) He; his C) He; him D) He; himselves

Writing

You want to invite your friend to the theatre. Write a note ( not less than 35 words) to him/her. Include this information:

· invite your friend to the theatre;

· say when and where you will meet;

· tell him/her what play you are going to see.

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Examination card N 5

Reading

Read the article and choose the correct item (A-D) to complete the sentences (1-5).



He is building a small house in the backyard for when their baby is old enough to use it as a fort or club-house or getaway, and he wants to have three walls up before his wife gets home. She is at her mother’s house because her mother has slipped on the ice - a skating party, Christmas-themed - and needs help with preparations for her holiday party, planned before the accident. It’s snowing lightly, and the air is cold enough to see. He is working on the small house with a new drill he’s bought that day. It’s a portable drill, and he marvels at its efficiency. He wants to prove something to his wife, because he doesn’t build things like this often, and she has implied that she likes it when he does build things, and when he goes biking or plays rugby in the men’s league. She was impressed when he assembled a telescope, a birthday gift, in two hours, when the manual had said it would take four. So when she’s gone during this day, and the air is gray and dense and the snow falls like ash, he works quickly, trying to get the foundation done. Once he’s finished with the foundation, he decides that to impress her - and he wants to impress her in some way every day and wants always to want to impress her - he will need at least three walls up on the house by the time she gets home.

Taken from “On Wanting to Have Three Walls up Before She Gets Home”

by Dave Eggers, The Guardian, 2004

The purpose of the small house is to ...

A) allow the man a fort to escape to.

B) appease the man’s wife who is forcing him to build it.

C) provide a clubhouse for the man’s child.

D) make the man’s wife happy.


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